The Trauma Professional's Blog
Another Anticoagulant To Watch Out For

In May, I wrote about a new direct thrombin inhibitor named dabigatran (Pradaxa). This drug appears beneficial for patients who need ongoing anticoagulation without the hassle of blood testing to check drug levels. The danger for trauma patients is that there is no antidote or rapid reversal possible. This means that significant traumatic bleeding, particularly in and around the brain, cannot be stopped! At Regions Hospital, we have seen a few patients on this drug, but luckily they have not had bleeding from trauma.

Late last month, Bristol-Myers Squibb and Pfizer announced that a new drug has shown very favorable results in preventing strokes in patients with atrial fibrillation (apixaban, Eliquis). Indeed, it cut the relatively low risk of stroke in half, compared to warfarin. It also had about a third fewer bleeding complications. It looks like it may also give dabigatran a run for its money.

This drug is a Factor Xa inhibitor, and also has no antidote other than time. There is some evidence that activated charcoal given orally within 3 hours of apixaban dosing may be somewhat helpful in reducing blood concentrations.

Trauma professionals need to be on the lookout for patients who use this drug. Any trauma patient who admits to being on a “blood thinner” needs to be questioned carefully to determine which one it is. If it is one of the newer drugs without an antidote, they need to be monitored continuously for signs of bleeding (read: ICU), especially if they have experienced head trauma. 

Bottom line: Be on the lookout for these drugs. If any patients who have fallen are taking this drug (elderly, frequently intoxicated, etc.), contact their primary physician so that the risks vs benefits of continuing it can be considered.

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  1. regionstraumapro posted this
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